Are you a boy?!

A year ago I cut off my waist length hair and donated it to an amazing charity called Little Princess Trust that makes wigs for children. I was in awe of the generosity of my friends and family who helped me to raise over £900 for the charity. I’m not going to lie and say that my actions stemmed from an innate desire to act charitably; in fact it was the Korean summer that instigated my plan.

I grew up in England, where the summer can be completely unpredictable; on an average day you might interchangeably need a jacket, jumper, umbrella and a cup of tea to survive the perils of the weather. However, Korean summers are cemented in a suffocating cocoon of heat and humidity that was foreign to me. It’s not uncommon for the weather in Ulsan to reach more than 30c, and this combined with close to 100% humidity is unbearable. I felt like I was drowning in sweat under my thick mop of curly hair, and I spent the majority of the summer with my hair scraped back off my face.

During this period I worried about how I would handle 6 months travelling around South East Asia – a region renowned for its hot, humid weather. I contemplated getting my hair braided, but the fact is that this takes a bit of work to maintain, and if I have to wash my hair more than once a week it’s too much effort for me. For years I had been growing out my hair, trying to get it as long as possible and keep it looking healthy, so it was with a bit of trepidation that I began contemplating cutting my hair short. However, after a lot of research I decided that this was by far the best option. Ultimately, this was my chance to give something back, and I would still reap the reward of a cool head whilst travelling. 

All of my life I have preferred the dentist to the hairdressers. Curly hair has this annoying ability of springing up an extra 6 inches when you get a one inch trim, and I’ve been left frustrated by an uncountable amount of haircuts. Evidently, I was terrified when I walked into the Korean hairdressers and requested that they remove the majority of my hair. 

In the end, I was happy with the results. Generally, I received a positive response from my friends and family. There were one or two students who didn’t like my new style, and on more than one occasion I have been asked whether I am a boy, but this doesn’t really bother me. One year later, I’m starting to grow out my hair again, and in a few years I plan to donate it once more. 

 

 

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